Wednesday, August 15, 2007

ARKANSAS CONNECTIONS

[Since the Democrats seem determined to nominate Hillary Clinton, we thought we would offer a little historical context from our time line of Arkansas and the Clintons, with particular emphasis on those things the mainstream media forgot to tell you]
 
1993
 
Arkansas Governor Jim Guy Tucker comes to Washington to see his old boss sworn in, leaving his state under the control of the president pro tem of the senate, Little Rock dentist Jerry Jewell. Jewell uses his power as acting governor to issue a number of pardons, one of them for a convicted drug dealer, Tommy McIntosh. According to the Washington Times, many in the state "say it was a political payoff, offered in exchange for dirty tricks Mr. McIntosh played on Clinton political opponents during the presidential campaign, or as a payoff for stopping his attacks on Mr. Clinton." It seems that the elder McIntosh had worked for Clinton in his last state campaign and, according to McIntosh in a 1991 lawsuit, had agreed not only to pay him $25,000 but to help him market his recipe for sweet potato pie and to pardon his son.
 
Webster Hubbell's name surfaces as a potential nominee for deputy attorney general but he tells friends he does not want that job or, reports Time, "to take any other position that involves Senate confirmation -- perhaps to avoid fishing expeditions into the law firm's confidential business."
 
Two Arkansas state troopers describe arguments between the Clintons, including (in the words of Washington Times reporter Jerry Seper) "foul-mouthed shouting matches and furniture-breaking sessions."
 
Hillary Clinton and David Watkins move to oust the White House travel office in favor of World Wide Travel, Clinton's source of $1 million in fly-now-pay-later campaign trips. The White House fires seven long-term employees for alleged mismanagement and kickbacks. The director, Billy Dale, charged with embezzlement, will be acquitted in less than two hours by the jury. An FBI agent involved in the case, IC Smith, will write later, "The White House Travel Office matter sent a clear message to the Congress as well as independent counsels that this Whit House would be different. Lying, withholding evidence, and considering - even expecting - underlings to be expendable so the Clintons could avoid accountability for their actins would become the norm."
 
According to a later report in Insight Magazine, the Clinton administration eavesdrops on over 300 locations during the Seattle Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Conference. FBI videotapes of diplomatic suites "show underage boys engaging in sexcapades with men in several rooms over a period of days." The operation involves the FBI, CIA, NSA and Office of Naval Intelligence. Bugged are hotel rooms, telephones, conference centers, cars, and even a charter boat. Some of the information obtained is apparently passed on to individuals with financial interests in Asia.
 
Vince Foster, the Clintons' attorney, finally files missing Whitewater tax returns.
 
The RTC and SBA investigate the $300,000 SBA-approved loan to Susan McDougal in 1986, provided by Capital-Management Services Inc. owned by David L. Hale. The FBI obtains a warrant to search Hale's office.
 
On July 19, FBI director William Sessions is fired. Clinton personally orders him by phone to turn in his FBI property and leave headquarters.
 
That evening, Clinton security aide Jerry Parks' wife Jane says she overhears a heated telephone conversation with Vince Foster in which her husband says, "You can't give Hillary those files, they've got my name all over them."
 
On July 20, Clinton names Louis Freeh as Sessions' successor. That same day, the FBI raids David Hale's Little Rock office and seizes documents including those relating to Capital-Management.
 
Just hours after the search warrant authorizing the raid is signed by a federal magistrate in Little Rock, Vince Foster apparently drives to Ft. Marcy Park without any car keys in a vehicle that changes color over the next few hours, walks across 700 feet of park without accruing any dirt or grass stains, and then shoots himself with a vanishing bullet that leaves only a small amount of blood. Or at least that is what would have to had occurred if official accounts are to be reconciled with the available evidence. There are numerous other anomalies in this quickly-declared suicide. Despite two badly misleading independent counsel reports, Foster's death will remain an unsolved mystery.
 
Less than three hours after Foster's body is found, his office is secretly searched by Clinton operatives, including Mrs. Clinton's chief of staff. Another search occurs two days later. Meanwhile, US Park Police and FBI agents are not allowed to search the office on grounds of "executive privilege."
 
Foster's suicide note is withheld from investigators for some 30 hours. The note is in 27 pieces with one other piece missing. Foster's personal diary will be withheld from the special prosecutor for a year despite being covered by a subpoena.
 
Patrick Knowlton, who stops in the park seventy minutes before Foster's body is found, reports seeing things that do not fit the official version. Declining under pressure to change his story, he is eventually subpoenaed by the Whitewater prosecutor. On that day, he becomes the target of extensive overt harassment and surveillance of a sort used by intelligence agencies to intimidate witnesses.
 
Jerry Parks, the Clinton security aide in Arkansas, known to have been keeping a dossier on Clinton, is gunned down two months after Foster's death in his car outside of Little Rock. Parks is shot through the rear window of his car and shot three more times, thru the side window, with a 9mm pistol. Parks ran American Contract Services, the business which supplied bodyguards for Clinton during his presidential campaign and the following transition. Bill Clinton still owed him $81,000. Parks had collected detailed data on Clinton's sexual escapades, including pictures and dates. Wife claims federal agents subsequently removed files and computer. She also says that upon learning of Vincent Foster's death, he told her, "I'm a dead man." In 2005, however, a woman claiming to be Parks' daughter will post on the Internet the claim that the murder was done at the behest of a member of the family.
 
Four years after Foster's death, the Progressive Review will summarize some of the remaining questions:
 
"Why did Miquel Rodriquez, the assistant US Attorney assigned by Starr to reopen the investigation into Foster's death resign? Was it true, as some have alleged, that he was blocked from aggressively pursuing the case? Why was he denied the opportunity to bring in experts outside the FBI to deal with inconsistencies?
 
Why did Starr, in reopening the Foster case, permit FBI agents to review their own work in the previous investigation?
 
There have been conflicting statements as to whether any x-rays were taken of Foster after his death. Were there or weren't there? If there were, where have they gone? If there weren't, why not?
 
It is standard police procedure to investigate suicides as though they were murders. Why wasn't this done in the case of Vince Foster?
 
Why did Bernard Nussbaum ask for the combination of Foster's safe immediately after his death?
 
Why were manila envelopes in the safe addressed "Eyes Only" to Janet Reno and William Kennedy never delivered to them? Where are these envelopes and what was in them?
 
Whose blood-stained car was towed to the FBI garage from Ft. Marcey Park the same night as Foster's death?
 
How did Foster walk 750 feet through a park without gathering any physical evidence of the hike on his shoes?
 
How did his glasses end up 19 feet from his body?
 
What were the origins of numerous carpet fibers found all over Foster's clothing and underwear?
 
How did it happen that all 35 mm film of the scene was either overexposed or missing?
 
How did it happen that most of the Polaroid shots have vanished?
 
How did Foster manage to shoot himself yet die laid out in the careful manner of someone placed in a coffin?
 
Why were there no fingerprints on the gun?
 
Why did no one hear the shot?
 
Where is Foster's appointment book?
 
How did car keys, not found during the investigation in the park, turn up with Foster at the morgue?
 
How was Foster's car opened at the park since officials claimed it was locked?
 
Where is the bullet that killed Foster?
 
Why did witnesses have their testimony changed and why was one witness subsequently harassed in a manner used by intelligence agents for intimidation?
 
What did Foster do in the hours between lunch time and when he supposedly killed?
 
What did Marsha Scott of the White House staff and Vince Foster talk about during the two hour meeting they had the day before he died? Why can't Marsha Scott remember?
 
What did Foster do on secret trips to Switzerland and other locations about which his wife knew nothing?
 
Why have police and rescue workers been forbidden to discuss the case?
 
John Clarke, the lawyer for Patrick Knowlton, raised some other issues:
 
- Can you tell us why no fingerprints were found on (1) the external surface of the gun found in Mr. Foster's hand; (2) the cartridge casing of the bullets found in the gun; (3) Mr. Foster's eyeglasses; (4) Mr. Foster's car; (5) any of the contents in his car; and (6) the torn "suicide" note?
 
- Between the hours of 4:30 p.m. and 6:05 p.m., there is a record of six witnesses -- Jennifer Wacha, Judith Doody, Mark Fiest, Todd Hall, Patrick Knowlton and George Gonzalez -- having seen an older brown Honda within the Fort Marcy parking lot, parked in the same spot as Mr. Foster's car was later found. Inasmuch as Mr. Foster's Honda was silver and much newer than the brown Honda described by the witnesses, and inasmuch as Mr. Foster was dead by 4:30, how is it that Mr. Foster's car arrived in the park after he was already dead?
 
The Washington Times will report later that Whitewater files were removed from Vince Foster's office after his death.

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