Monday, June 2, 2008

BREVITAS

WORD

Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long - Ogden Nash

PHOTOS TAKEN FROM THE RFK FUNERAL TRAIN

THREE BOOKS ON MCCAIN

A federal judge in California has called Washington Times newspaper reporter William Gertz to identify the confidential sources who told him about an investigation into alleged Chinese spying, the New York Sun reported. Judge Cormac Carney subpoenaed Gertz to appear June 13 in his Santa Ana courtroom and name the people who told him that criminal charges were expected to be filed against engineer Chi Mak and his relatives. The move came after a year-long FBI investigation to identify Gertz's sources. Chi Mak was convicted last year of being an unregistered agent for China and was recently sentenced to 24 years in prison. His wife and three other relatives pled guilty to related charges. Gertz's is the third high-profile case to be weighed while Congress debates the merits of a federal shield law to protect reporters from court efforts to identify their sources. ABC

The NYT reports on concerns about a growing labor shortage in Iowa and tells readers that "remedies are not simple." In the very next sentence we learn that: "wages are lower than elsewhere in the nation or region, except South Dakota.". . . There is a labor shortage in Iowa. Wages are the second lowest in the country. Come on folks, the NYT is supposed to be a serious newspaper. I need a vacation. Dean Baker, Prospect

THE WORST COUNTRIES IN WHICH TO BE A WOMAN

FURTHERMORE. . .

If nonprofits think the current economy is troublesome, the message from Frank Forsberg of the Greater Twin Cities United Way is hold on tight, it's going to get worse. "Make sure that you realize that the biggest challenges are still to come - they are coming in 2009 and 2010," Forsberg, senior vice president of community impact, told a room of 200-plus nonprofit leaders . . . Nonprofits are particularly dependent on government spending and private largess, which swing with the economy. . . Other speakers added their own worry lines. Nan Madden, Minnesota Budget Project director for MCN, said nonprofit human services . . . receive 18 percent of revenue from government grants, and 59 percent from service charges including government fees and contracts. Minneapolis Post

Four out of ten [Swedish] local officials claim to have been offered bribes to secure alcohol licenses. Six out ten claim that many licenses should never have been issued, a new survey from Svenska Dagbladet shows. The bribes have included VIP cards, money in anonymous envelopes, expensive dinners, free spirits and chocolates . . .



1 Comments:

At June 3, 2008 7:50 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"There is a labor shortage in Iowa. Wages are the second lowest in the country."

What they meant to say was there is a slave labor shortage in Iowa.

America used to own its slaves now it just rents them.

 

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