Tuesday, June 17, 2008

THE SOCIALIST IN THE FRAY

WMNF, FL Last fall, while the presidential hopefuls from the two major parties were gearing up for a season of primary elections, the Socialist Party USA chose their 2008 presidential nominee. He's Brian Moore, of Spring Hill, Florida, just north of Tampa. But, being the nominee of a minor party does not necessarily get someone on the ballot.

Moore beat out four other Socialist Party USA candidates on the third ballot at their national convention in St. Louis last October. But unlike the Democrats and Republicans, the elected nominee from the Socialist Party USA, one of several socialist parties in the country, does not automatically get on the ballot in any state. Instead, Moore said, he has to 'work at it and earn each state.'. . .

Many require tens of thousands of signatures or expensive filing fees. California for one requires about 158,000 signatures if you wanted to run as an independent candidate and 89,000 signatures as a party. Maryland 32,000 signatures, Michigan 38,000 signatures. They just try to beat you down, one way or the other.". . .

The Socialist Party USA has about three thousand members across the country. Instead of working for his campaign, Moore said, volunteers work to coordinate access to each state’s ballot. . .

Moore's platform includes an immediate end to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, free and accessible national healthcare, and transferring ownership of corporations to the workers. . .

Moore is already on the ballot in Vermont and will qualify in six other states soon. He expects to be on the ballot of at least twenty states by November’s election.

3 Comments:

At June 17, 2008 8:12 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Congratulations, Sam, on running a non-negative story on the dreaded 'S' word. Socialism seems to be the fastest growing political/economic philosophy in the world today, but mum's the word on the US mainstream media. And a mention of socialiam will still strike fear in the hearts of many, if not most, of our countrymen today (though not in the hearts of Europeans, whose media are somewhat more forthcoming).
Brian Moore's following of only 3,000 people speaks volumes on the power of the mainstream media to influence thought and opinion to the benefit of our ruling elite. While Brian's election, with backing, would probably solve about 90% of the country's problems, the majority remain in the dark, unaware of this fact, still believing the Repubs/Demos will work to change things. Pity.

 
At June 17, 2008 10:35 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

But the Repubs/Demos ARE working to change things. They are almost finished in dismantling the Republic, eliminating all civil rights, and handing control of the country over to a small handful of powerful corporations. They just need four more years...

 
At June 19, 2008 7:52 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Why do small parties of the left waste their time, money and energies on campaigns for national office that they know will be fruitless? I suppose it is mainly to make their voices heard, even if not too many will hear them. But there are better ways to advance their causes, while making a genuine contribution toward furthering the purposes of the left, and that is by pooling the votes of all parties to the left of center for the candidate of the leftist party which has the best chance of winning.


The party of the left most sizable and recognized, and with most members now in elected office, is the Greens. Granted, they are not very far to the left, and they probably would not erect statues to Marx and Engels in Central Park if elected, but they would give us a democratic political environment where people who would like to see those statues erected would have an opportunity to be heard, and possibly in the future, elected -- something very unlikely to happen under the present two party system.


All parties of the left could retain their party structure, membership, projects for state recognition, etc. The only thing they might do differently is not run a candidate for national office, and suggest to their membership that they vote for the Green (or the candidate of the party of the left which is strongest at the time).


There would be no losers if this were to happen, and all parties would be making a real contribution to the common cause. The strongest party, even if it did not win, would likely obtain enough votes to qualify for federal funding. And this strong party could be obligated, by agreement, to publicise the names of those parties that assisted in its campaign, thereby assisting the recognition of those parties in state and local campaigns. And when, some day in the future, a party of the left is finally elected, all parties of the left will see most of their wishes come true.


It's cooperation among all forces of the left that is needed, friends -- let's save our competitive energies to sink the two party system.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home