Monday, December 15, 2008

ARE BOYS BEING ELIMINATED BY POLLUTION?

Natural News - Canada's national newspaper, The Globe and Mail, reports something is happening to men and boys which concerns scientists and researchers: fewer boys are being born than girls. In a study by Dr. Devra Davis of the University of Pittsburgh, the combined figures for U.S. and Japan is a "staggering tally of 262,000 'missing boys' from 1970 to about 2000 because of a decline in the sex ratio at birth."

Scientists are also puzzled why there is a lopsided ratio of girls to boys being born in the Canada's Aamjiwnaang First Nation. Interestingly enough, this community is almost surrounded by petrochemical plants. In Canadian babies, hypospadiasis has increased by 60% since the mid-1970's. This is a disfiguring defect, where the urinary opening is on the underside of the penis rather than its normal anatomical position. Other countries are seeing an increase in this condition as well.

From 1983 to 2005, young Canadian males in the 20 to 44 age bracket have seen a 54 per cent rise in testicular cancer. Testosterone levels in U.S. men have declined by nearly 20% over the past two decades. Both fertility and virility rates are down, including the shrinking size of male gonads.

There's a definite parallel in the animal kingdom. Man-made chemical toxins frequently assault males of different species with fiercer effects. Amphibians such as male toads are being feminized.

University of Florida zoologist, Dr. Theo Colborn, author of "Our Stolen Future" and president of the Colorado-based Endocrine Disruption Exchange, offered her expert opinion. She fears some chemicals are impeding normal brain development, with greater impact on males. As an example, she cites attention deficit disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as two to four times greater in boys than girls. She also feels chemical exposures could explain why enrollment at U.S. and Canadian universities favors females, currently at 60 to 40 per cent.

Of the world's 100,000 registered chemicals, many are endocrine disruptors, exhibiting toxic hormonal effects along with carcinogenicity. Even in mere parts per million, these chemicals can upset the intricate working of human hormones. Xenoestrogens are found in DDT and other organophosphate pesticides, PCB's, plastics, bisphenol A, DES, as well as mercury and uranium.