UNDERNEWS

Undernews is the online report of the Progressive Review, edited by Sam Smith, who has covered Washington during all or part of one quarter of America's presidencies and edited alternative journals since 1964. The Review has been on the web since 1995. See main page for full contents

February 16, 2009

ISRAELIS USE GAZA FOR ILLEGAL & UNTESTED WEAPONS

Conn Hallihan, Foreign Policy in Focus - Erik Fosse, a Norwegian cardiologist, worked in Gaza hospitals during the recent war." It was as if they had stepped on a mine," he says of certain Palestinian patients he treated. "But there was no shrapnel in the wound. Some had lost their legs. It looked as though they had been sliced off. I have been to war zones for 30 years, but I have never seen such injuries before."

Dr. Fosse was describing the effects of a U.S. "focused lethality" weapon that minimizes explosive damage to structures while inflicting catastrophic wounds on its victims. But where did the Israelis get this weapon? And was their widespread use in the attack on Gaza a field test for a new generation of explosives?

The specific weapon is called a Dense Inert Metal Explosive. In 2000, the U.S. Air Force teamed up with the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The weapon wraps high explosives with a tungsten alloy and other metals like cobalt, nickel, or iron in a carbon fiber/epoxy container. When the bomb explodes the container evaporates, and the tungsten turns into micro-shrapnel that is extremely lethal within a 13-foot radius. Tungsten is inert, so it doesn't react chemically with the explosive. While a non-inert metal like aluminum would increase the blast, tungsten actually contains the explosion to a limited area.

Within the weapon's range, however, it's inordinately lethal. According to Norwegian doctor Mad Gilbert, the blast results in multiple amputations and "very severe fractures. The muscles are sort of split from the bones, hanging loose, and you also have quite severe burns." Most of those who survive the initial blast quickly succumb to septicemia and organ collapse. "Initially, everything seems in orderbut it turns out on operation that dozens of miniature particles can be found in all their organs," says Dr. Jam Brommundt, a German doctor working in Kham Younis, a city in southern Gaza. "It seems to be some sort of explosive or shell that disperses tiny particlesthat penetrate all organs, these miniature injuries, you are not able to attack them surgically." According to Brommundt, the particles cause multiple organ failures.

If by some miracle victims resist those conditions, they are almost certain to develop rhabdomyosarcoma, a particularly deadly cancer that deeply embeds itself into tissue and is almost impossible to treat. A 2005 U.S. Department of health study found that tungsten stimulated RMS cancers even in very low doses. All of the 92 rats tested developed the cancer.

While DIMEs were originally designed to avoid "collateral" damage generated by standard high- explosive bombs, the weapon's lethality and profound long-term toxicity hardly seem like an improvement.

It appears DIME weapons may have been used in the 2006 Israeli invasion of Lebanon, but not enough to alarm medical workers. But in Gaza, the ordinance was widely used. Al-Shifta alone has seen 100 to 150 victims of these attacks.

Dr. Gilbert told the Oslo Gardermoen, "there is a strong suspicion that Gaza is now being used as a test laboratory for new weapons."

DIME is a U.S. invention. Did the Israelis get the weapons from the United States, or did they design similar ones themselves? Given the close relations between the two militaries, it isn't unlikely that the U.S. Air Force supplied the weapons or, at least, the specifications on how to construct them. And since the United States has yet to use the device in a war, it would certainly benefit from seeing how these new "focused lethality" weapons worked under battlefield conditions.

Marc Garlasco, Human Rights Watch's senior military advisor, says "it remains to be seen how Israel has acquired the technology, whether they purchased weapons from the United States under some agreement, or if they in fact licensed or developed their own type of munitions."

DIME weapons aren't banned under the Geneva Conventions because they have never been officially tested. However, any weapon capable of inflicting such horrendous damage is normally barred from use, particularly in one of the most densely populated regions in the world.

For one thing, no one knows how long the tungsten remains in the environment or how it could affect people who return to homes attacked by a DIME. University of Arizona cancer researcher Dr. Mark Witten, who investigates links between tungsten and leukemia, says that in his opinion "there needs to be much more research on the health effects of tungsten before the military increases its usage."

DIMEs weren't the only controversial weapons used in Gaza. The Israeli Defense Forces also made generous use of white phosphorus, a chemical that burns with intense heat and inflicts terrible burns on victims. In its vapor form it also damages breathing passages. International law prohibits the weapon's use near population areas and requires that "all reasonable precautions" be taken to avoid civilians.

Israel initially denied using the chemical. "The IDF acts only in accordance with what is permitted by international law and does not use white phosphorus," said Israel's Chief of Staff Gabi Ashkenazi on January 13.

But eyewitness accounts in Gaza and Israel soon forced the IDF to admit that they were, indeed, using the substance. On January 20, the IDF confessed to using phosphorus artillery shells as smokescreens, as well as 200 U.S.-made M825A1 phosphorus mortar shells on "Hamas fighters and rocket launching crews in northern Gaza."

Three of those shells hit the UN Works and Relief Agency compound on January 15, igniting a fire that destroyed hundreds of tons of humanitarian supplies. A phosphorus shell also hit Al-Quds hospital in Gaza City. The Israelis say there were Hamas fighters near the two targets, a charge that witnesses adamantly deny.

Donatella Rovera of Amnesty International said: "Such extensive use of this weapon in Gaza's densely-populated residential neighborhoods and its toll on civilians is a war crime."

Israel is also accused of using depleted uranium ammunition, which a UN sub-commission in 2002 found in violation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the UN Charter, the Geneva Conventions, the International Convention Against Torture, the Conventional Weapons Convention, and the Hague Conventions against the use of poison weapons.

DUA isn't highly radioactive, but after exploding, some of it turns into a gas that can easily be inhaled. The dense shrapnel that survives also tends to bury itself deeply, leaching low-level radioactivity into water- tables.

3 Comments:

Blogger Be Green said...

Auto Alternatives (Affordable, Safe & Reliable): There are smaller, more efficient auto manufacturers that can replace the Big-3. For every $1 Billion dollars the federal government gives or guarantees for the Big-2 (soon to be 3), BG Automotive Group, could build 40 assembly plants (located in 40 separate cities where employment is needed), hiring 12,000 employees, and producing 600,000- 100% electric vehicles. We can save the jobs and save us from our dependence on foreign oil. The latter figures are for EACH $1 Billion dollar allocation. We would also be requiring more batteries/battery packs than the North American battery industry could produce. We would also require 600,000 U.S. made motors, computer systems, etc. to operate the vehicles. 100% of our components under the hood, including the power system, is made in America and assembled by Americans.

We have a huge demand, domestic and foreign for our electric vehicles, but do not have the funds required for the production expansion to meet the overall demand. BGelectricCars.com

February 16, 2009 2:55 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

WAR CRIMES - OPEN LETTER TO AN IDF SOLDIER

Sir


I have no proof that 420 Arab children were killed in Gaza, but I have relied on the figures quoted by the world’s media. Whether they are authentic or not, I just don’t know.

If the figure was not 420, maybe it was 320, or 220, or just 120. Perhaps even only twenty. And, I have no evidence of how old these children were. Some were undoubtedly babies or infants – as I have seen photographs of the bodies, but others could well have been eight, or ten – perhaps even teenagers.

What I do know and what I am very clear about is that the killing of even twenty children – whether infants or not, was a crime as they could have posed no threat to your powerful tanks, planes and helicopter gunships.

I also know that my religion – I am Jewish – expressly forbids such killings. So does international law. So does the United Nations. And so does Christianity.

The Geneva Conventions on Human Rights prohibits such unlawful behaviour and anyone alleged guilty of such a war crime must, by international law, be brought before the International Criminal Court to answer such charges.

That is the law and that is democracy and that is how our society, and your society, works. Otherwise, there is no democracy, no justice and no law and we could all just kill those we wanted out of the way or who were just inconvenient.

If there were war crimes committed in Gaza, by either side, then those responsible, must be brought to justice. Can you help?

R.A.P

February 17, 2009 3:15 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

So, "Buddy, Can You Spare A DIME" returns as the theme of this Depression, too.

February 17, 2009 5:26 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home