UNDERNEWS

Undernews is the online report of the Progressive Review, edited by Sam Smith, who has covered Washington during all or part of one quarter of America's presidencies and edited alternative journals since 1964. The Review has been on the web since 1995. See main page for full contents

April 11, 2009

CITY GOVERNMENTS SQUEEZING CITIZENS WITH NEW FEES

David Segal, New York Times - Last July, Winter Haven became one of a few dozen cities in the country to start charging "accident response fees."� The idea is to shift the expense of tending to and cleaning up crashes directly to at-fault drivers. Either they, or their insurers, are expected to pay.

Such cash-per-crash ordinances tend to infuriate motorists, and they often generate bad press, but a lot of cities are finding them hard to resist. With the economy flailing and budgets strained, state and local governments are being creative about ways to raise money. And the go-to idea is to invent a fee - or simply raise one.

Ohio's governor has proposed a budget with more than 150 new or increased fees, including a fivefold increase in the cost to renew a livestock license, as well as larger sums to register a car, order a birth certificate or dump trash in a landfill. Other fees take aim at landlords, cigarette sellers and hospitals, to name a few.

Wisconsin's governor, James E. Doyle, has proposed a charge on slaughterhouses that would be levied on the basis of each animal slaughtered. He also wants to more than triple the application charge for an elk-hunting license to $10, an idea that has raised eyebrows because the elk population in the state is currently too small to allow an actual hunting season.

Washington's mayor, Adrian M. Fenty, has proposed a "streetlight user fee"� of $4.25 a month, to be added to electric bills, that would cover the cost of operating and maintaining the city's streetlights. New York City recently expanded its anti-idling law to include anyone parked near a school who leaves the engine running for more than a minute. Doing that will cost you $100.

1 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just taxes with a name to it. Got to pay for these services somehow. Prefer that to farming it out to the private sector who will no doubt charge more.

April 12, 2009 9:26 PM  

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