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The Coastal Packet

The longtime national journal, Progressive Review, has moved its headquarters from Washington DC to Freeport, Maine, where its editor, Sam Smith, has long ties. This is a local edition dealing with Maine news and progressive politics.

6/26/09

Friday, June 26


Portland Press Herald -
Regional fishery managers voted in favor of a new system that will allow groups of fishermen - called sectors - to catch certain percentages of the ocean's cod, haddock, flounder and other groundfish, starting next year. For the past 15 years, fishermen have caught as many fish as they could under increasingly tight limits on fishing days and other rules. . . The number of active ground fish boats in Maine has dropped from about 350 to 70 in the past 15 years . . . Under the new rules, fishermen have a choice of whether to join one of 19 sectors in New England or work under day-at-sea limits. Most are expected to join sectors.

Litchfield is using park attendants to clean up after geese, filling two to three five gallon buckets a day with their feces. . . Morning Sentinel - Selectmen refused to sign a $992 contract to have employees at the U.S. Department of Agriculture gather the geese and release them up north.
"We didn't think it was a permanent cure," said Glen Ridley, who was elected chairman of selectmen this week. "There are all kinds of geese at the golf course. If we relocate 10 or 20 or 50, we're spending $992 for something that may not work.". .
One possibility, which we've thought about but haven't tried: a dead goose decoy. Birdbusters sells them, saying that it should be "placed in an 'agony' posture, convincing live geese that a predator has made a fresh kill, tapping into fear and flight response in the live geese, causing them to flee the area."

Big closure of clam flats because of the heavy rains. More

Casco Bay Boaters
explains why the water is salty. You can blame the rocks on land for much of it.

Lesbians in Maine: some history

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