UNDERNEWS

Undernews is the online report of the Progressive Review, edited by Sam Smith, who has covered Washington during all or part of one quarter of America's presidencies and edited alternative journals since 1964. The Review has been on the web since 1995. See main page for full contents

June 2, 2009

SOTOMAYER'S FELLOW PRINCETON GRAD

James Ridgeway, Unsilent Generation - Sotomayor found her own way at Princeton, becoming involved in the campus Puerto Rican group, which helped file a 1974 complaint with the federal government based on the university's a "lack of commitment" to federally mandated minority recruitment goals. Twenty years after her graduation, she would say in a speech that while "it is not politics or its struggles that creates a Latino or Latina identity. . . Princeton and my life experiences since have taught me that having a Latina identity anchors me in this otherwise alien world." . . .

In November 2005, a few weeks after George W. Bush nominated Samuel Alito, documents emerged showing that in a 1985 application for a job in the Reagan Justice Department, Alito had listed under his "personal qualifications" the fact that he was "a member of the Concerned Alumni of Princeton University, a conservative alumni group." The New York Times reported at the time:

"The group had been founded in 1972, the year that Judge Alito graduated, by alumni upset that Princeton had recently begun admitting women. It published a magazine, Prospect, which persistently accused the administration of taking a permissive approach to student life, of promoting birth control and paying for abortions, and of diluting the explicitly Christian character of the school.

As Princeton admitted a growing number of minority students, Concerned Alumni charged repeatedly that the administration was lowering admission standards, undermining the university's distinctive traditions and admitting too few children of alumniā€¦.A pamphlet for parents suggested that "racial tensions" and loose oversight of campus social life were contributing to a spike in campus crime. A brochure for Princeton alumni warned, "The unannounced goal of the administration, now achieved, of a student population of approximately 40 percent women and minorities will largely vitiate the alumni body of the future."

Alito said that he did not recall being in CAP, and his supporters tried to characterize it as simply a "conservative" alumni group. But that the Concerned Alumni of Princeton was a racist and sexist organization was not even a debatable point. CAP's brand of "conservatism" is reflected in a piece in the group's magazine written by its co-chair, Shelby Cullom Davis, a notorious right-winger and one of Princeton's largest alumni donors:

5 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

-- the September 11, 2001 attack gave cover to including "security" as part of a future partnership

"The True Story of the Bilderberg Group" and What They May Be Planning Now
A Review of Daniel Estulin's book


by Stephen Lendman

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=13808

June 2, 2009 1:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Jocks v. Tavernier starts with the breakdown of a tractor-trailer on the Long Island Expressway in 1994. Thomas Jocks, a truck driver, tried to pull his truck off the highway when his engine failed. He made it onto the shoulder, but about 4 feet of the trailer were jutting out into the right-hand lane. Jocks put up flares behind the truck, as state law requires. But he was worried about causing an accident. Unable to flag down another car, he ran three-quarters of a mile to a gas station, which had an outdoor pay phone (1990s = the pre-cell-phone dark age). Augusto Tavernier was talking on the phone, actually from inside his car, because the phone had a cord designed to be used that way.
Jocks gave the following account of what happened next: He ran up and told Tavernier there was an emergency because his truck was jutting out onto the expressway. Tavernier told him to find another phone. Jocks repeated the emergency part of his story. Tavernier swore at him. Jocks knocked on his windshield and kept urging him to give him the phone. Finally, Jocks went into the phone stand and hung up on Tavernier's call. At that point, Jocks said, Tavernier threw the receiver at him, tried to get out of his car, couldn't because the phone stand was blocking his door, and drove forward. Jocks dialed 911. Tavernier charged him, yelling. Jocks yelled back. Tavernier said, "Why don't I blow your fucking brains out?" and drew his gun. He pressed the gun into the back of Jocks' head, and said, "Freeze, police"; and then an off-duty Nassau County police officer arrived, got the situation under control, and arrested Jocks.

June 2, 2009 2:19 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Tavernier, too, p
Jocks v. Tavernier starts with the breakdown of a tractor-trailer on the Long Island Expressway in 1994. Thomas Jocks, a truck driver, tried to pull his truck off the highway when his engine failed. He made it onto the shoulder, but about 4 feet of the trailer were jutting out into the right-hand lane. Jocks put up flares behind the truck, as state law requires. But he was worried about causing an accident. Unable to flag down another car, he ran three-quarters of a mile to a gas station, which had an outdoor pay phone (1990s = the pre-cell-phone dark age). Augusto Tavernier was talking on the phone, actually from inside his car, because the phone had a cord designed to be used that way.
Jocks gave the following account of what happened next: He ran up and told Tavernier there was an emergency because his truck was jutting out onto the expressway. Tavernier told him to find another phone. Jocks repeated the emergency part of his story. Tavernier swore at him. Jocks knocked on his windshield and kept urging him to give him the phone. Finally, Jocks went into the phone stand and hung up on Tavernier's call. At that point, Jocks said, Tavernier threw the receiver at him, tried to get out of his car, couldn't because the phone stand was blocking his door, and drove forward. Jocks dialed 911. Tavernier charged him, yelling. Jocks yelled back. Tavernier said, "Why don't I blow your fucking brains out?" and drew his gun. He pressed the gun into the back of Jocks' head, and said, "Freeze, police"; and then an off-duty Nassau County police officer arrived, got the situation under control, and arrested Jo
Jocks v. Tavernier starts with the breakdown of a tractor-trailer on the Long Island Expressway in 1994. Thomas Jocks, a truck driver, tried to pull his truck off the highway when his engine failed. He made it onto the shoulder, but about 4 feet of the trailer were jutting out into the right-hand lane. Jocks put up flares behind the truck, as state law requires. But he was worried about causing an accident. Unable to flag down another car, he ran three-quarters of a mile to a gas station, which had an outdoor pay phone (1990s = the pre-cell-phone dark age). Augusto Tavernier was talking on the phone, actually from inside his car, because the phone had a cord designed to be used that way.

June 2, 2009 2:20 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The jury believed Jocks and awarded him more than $600,000 in damages. Tavernier and the detective appealed. The judges on the panel for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit were Sotomayor; Pierre Leval, a Clinton appointee; and John Walker Jr., appointed by President George Herbert Walker Bush, who is his cousin (Walker and Walker, same family). From the beginning, Sotomayor backed Tavernier. She saw his arrest of Jocks as reasonable. Leval and Walker were on the other side.

Walker wrote an opinion affirming the jury verdict, 2-1. But the drafting took a long time, and when a draft was finally circulated, Sotomayor responded to it by arguing that the grounds for a reasonable arrest are broad. As an off-duty cop who'd been hit in the face with a phone after an altercation, she argued, Tavernier was justified in making the arrest as a matter of law. That meant throwing out the jury verdict. Walker could not get her to change her mind. Instead, Leval decided he was persuaded by Sotomayor's argument about how broad the grounds for making an arrest can be and switched sides. Finally, Walker gave up and switched, too. His written opinion throws one bone to Jocks by leaving open the possibility of a new trial based on one narrow argument (that he acted in self-defense when he threw the phone). But throwing out the $600,000-plus jury award was a huge blow to the plaintiff. The case was retried in 2007, and Jocks lost, based on the more constraining jury instructions that the trial judge gave because of the 2nd Circuit ruling.*

Why did Sotomayor see the case the way she did? Maybe because she is a former prosecutor: She went straight from Yale Law School to the Manhattan district attorney's office in 1979 and tried dozens of criminal cases there over five years. Or maybe Sotomayor has other reasons; it's hard to know. And in the end, the other two judges involved agreed she was right on the law. But what's striking, of course, is that she persuaded them to undo a verdict in a case that a jury saw as rife with police abuse of power. "You read this unanimous opinion, and it would seem to be the Republican judge who is driving this decision that she just signed on to. When in fact it was exactly the opposite," one observer said.

June 2, 2009 2:27 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

http://www.slate.com/id/2219251/ Sotomayer sides with lying cop to overturn jury verdict. Also decides students offcampus criticism of school officials might cause disruption of school. I don't recall reading that addendum to the first amendment in school.http://www.nbcconnecticut.com/news/local/Critics-unhappy-with-Sotomayors-role-in-CT-free-speech-case.htmlHowever she later rules racist cop's comments are protected free speech.http://bulk.resource.org/courts.gov/c/F3/290/290.F3d.143.00-9487.html

June 2, 2009 2:36 PM  

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