UNDERNEWS

Undernews is the online report of the Progressive Review, edited by Sam Smith, who covered Washington during all or part of one quarter of America's presidencies and edited alternative journals since 1964. The Review, which has been on the web since 1995, is now published from Freeport, Maine. See main page for full contents

September 18, 2009

LACK OF HEALTH INSURANCE HELPS CAUSE 45,000 DEATHS EACH YEAR

Physicians for a National Health Plan - A study estimates nearly 45,000 annual deaths are associated with lack of health insurance. That figure is about two and a half times higher than an estimate from the Institute of Medicine in 2002. The new study, "Health Insurance and Mortality in U.S. Adults," appears in today's online edition of the American Journal of Public Health. The Harvard-based researchers found that uninsured, working-age Americans have a 40 percent higher risk of death than their privately insured counterparts, up from a 25 percent excess death rate found in 1993. . . Deaths associated with lack of health insurance now exceed those caused by many common killers such as kidney disease. REPORT

3 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

And 200,000 Americans a year who do have insurance die from stupid medical mistakes. Who are the biggest losers here?

September 19, 2009 1:16 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Get a grip on reality. The biggest losers are still the ones who die because they never even have the possibility of decent care due to lack of insurance. The people who die from stupid medical mistakes chose the wrong doctor. Those without insurance can't afford to see one at all.

Of course, our corporate masters don't care about an extra 45,000 deaths. Like Scrooge, they're happy to lose some of the excess population.

FoE

September 19, 2009 10:07 AM  
Blogger info said...

As my middle schoolers were working with their student and lab microscopes we cover current events and this news item came up. We had read a couple of blogs about this particular report that cited it may have some inaccuracies or biasing. Does anyone know if the reports are true, or are the results reasonably accurate?

September 19, 2009 3:26 PM  

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