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UNDERNEWS

Undernews is the online report of the Progressive Review, edited by Sam Smith, who covered Washington during all or part of ten of America's presidencies and who has edited alternative journals since 1964. The Review, which has been on the web since 1995, is now published from Freeport, Maine. We get over 5 million article visits a year. See prorev.com for full contents of our site

January 25, 2010

BRITISH HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION SAYS WORKERS SHOULD NOT BE FORCED TO RETIRE

Observer, UK- Workers should be able to stay in their jobs beyond the age of 65, and employers should be incentivised to allow older employees to work flexibly, the UK's equality watchdog said today.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission said the ageing population and an increased willingness to work among older people meant it was time for the government to scrap the default retirement age, a law which allows firms to force staff to finish work at 65.

It said scrapping the rule would remove the "safety net" for employers and encourage more radical approaches to issues such as flexibility, handling the performance of workers of all ages, and improving occupational health.

Hand-in-hand with this change, EHRC said, the government should extend the right to request flexible working to all employees and consider introducing incentives for flexible employers, with a particular emphasis on the over-50s.

The commission said the economy "would be the biggest winner" from the proposed changes, with research from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research suggesting that extending working lives by 18 months would earn Britain L15bn. . .

A survey of 1,500 workers by the commission suggests a rule change would be welcomed by many workers. It found that 64% of women and 24% of men wanted to remain economically active after the state pension age (currently 65 for men and rising to 65 for women by 2020).

Around 60% said they wanted to continue working but on a part-time basis, while 40% said they would like to stay in their current jobs but with greater flexibility in hours worked. . .


2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

in Quebec, the mandatory age of retirement was abolished about 15 years ago.

January 25, 2010 9:33 PM  
Anonymous arnel said...

wow great story...

January 26, 2010 4:36 AM  

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