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UNDERNEWS

Undernews is the online report of the Progressive Review, edited by Sam Smith, who covered Washington during all or part of ten of America's presidencies and who has edited alternative journals since 1964. The Review, which has been on the web since 1995, is now published from Freeport, Maine. We get over 5 million article visits a year. See prorev.com for full contents of our site

January 13, 2010

BRITISH TOWN PLANS TO REPLACE PUBLIC FLOWERS WITH VEGGIES

Guardian, UK - A Lancashire town is experimenting with using traditional floral displays, including hanging baskets and herbaceous borders, to grow slightly less colorful but more practical greens.

The idea taking shape in Clitheroe is to replace flowers with edible vegetables and offer a modest "pick-your-own" service of plantings to anyone passing by.

The most striking feature will be three-tiered flower/vegetable structures in the centre of the town, if a motion put forward by councillors gets the go-ahead later this month. . .

The plan is also being promoted in neighbouring Rossendale, which includes the towns of Haslingden, Rawtenstall and Bacup, and could see them adorned with red-flowered runner beans or purple-sprouting broccoli. The area has a strong tradition of allotments, recently bolstered by fruit and nut tree planting in public places by green enthusiasts.

Rose Connor, a councillor who will propose the Clitheroe motion, said the aim was to encourage people to think about sourcing food nearby. "We need to move towards that sort of economy, taking responsibility as individuals for our own food production," she said.

The initiative follows successful pioneering in another Pennine town, Todmorden, where the Yorkshire-Lancashire boundary bisects the town hall and cricket pitch.

Vegetable beds, herb gardens and orchards have sprung up on sites as varied - and previously urban - as the railway station forecourt and an elderly people's home, under the aegis of the Incredible Edible Todmorden campaign.

Volunteers have replaced "inedible" planting outside the town's health centre with apple and pear trees, made watercress beds in a local park and given free vegetable seeds to social housing tenants. Schools use local produce and the long-term aim is complete self-reliance for food by 2018.

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1 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I hope they have good leash laws in those towns, or dog proof fences around the food beds. It would be awful to go picking a salad for dinner and find a big dog has left a poo right in the salad bed.

January 14, 2010 11:10 AM  

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