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UNDERNEWS

Undernews is the online report of the Progressive Review, edited by Sam Smith, who covered Washington during all or part of ten of America's presidencies and who has edited alternative journals since 1964. The Review, which has been on the web since 1995, is now published from Freeport, Maine. We get over 5 million article visits a year. See prorev.com for full contents of our site

January 13, 2010

YOUR MONEY IS SAFE WITH BANK OF AMERICA, BUT YOUR HOUSE MIGHT NOT BE

Galveston News - A West End property owner is suing Bank of America Corp., asserting its agents mistakenly seized a vacation house he owns free and clear, then changed the locks and shut the power off, resulting in the smelly spoiling of about 75 pounds of salmon and halibut from an Alaska fishing trip and other damages. Dr. Alan Schroit filed the lawsuit . . . after he and Bank of America were unable to agree on a settlement, attorney Barry A. Brown said.

Bank of America officials on Friday said they had not had an opportunity to review the lawsuit and typically decline to comment on pending litigation. But the bank is familiar with the case.

"Based on previous discussions with Mr. Schroit, we do not believe the case will show merit," spokesman Rick Simon said.

When Schroit's wife tried to unlock the door, the key wouldn't work, he said. They noticed a poster with the message that the house had been seized by Bank of America in a foreclosure.

"We have nothing to do with Bank of America," Schroit said.

Schroit called an emergency number on the poster and got a recording advising him to call back during normal office hours during the week, he said.

Schroit said he suspects the bank was really after a house with the same address number on the next street.

Agents working for Bank of America cut off power to the property by turning off the main switch in the lower part of the house, according to the lawsuit. They also changed the locks, so Schroit was unable to reach the switch to turn the power back on, according to the lawsuit.

The Schroits called the police and finally managed to get into the top part of their house, only to be hit by an "overpowering putrid smell of rotten fish," according to the lawsuit. . .

The Schroits had planned to grill some of the fish for the party.

"It was the most unbearable stench," Schroit said. "It was so unbearable the police officer asked if we could leave the house so he could take the report; it was absolutely horrible, a gooey mess."

The Schroits returned to Houston and told people they had invited that the party had been canceled.


1 Comments:

Anonymous Andrea said...

There is no option for the Bank besides this step.This procedure,unless they adopt banks again may go to financial crises.

January 13, 2010 6:11 PM  

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