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The Coastal Packet

The longtime national journal, Progressive Review, has moved its headquarters from Washington DC to Freeport, Maine, where its editor, Sam Smith, has long ties. This is a local edition dealing with Maine news and progressive politics.

2/3/10

DOWN EAST NOTES

Only 12 of Maine's 183 school districts are going to get more state aid in the next fiscal year. Overall there will be a $92 million drop in assistance.

Pine Tree Politics - The unbeatable Governor Angus King raised only an anemic $1305.00 in the entire year of 1997 in the lead up to his re-election campaign? In the January 2002 pre-election semiannual (i.e. just the second half of 2001), then Congressman John Baldacci raked in a staggering $329,258.97 for his budding race for Governor, which frightened potential primary challenger Chellie Pingree so much, she folded like a cheap suit.

Seacoast Online - The town of Vienna, Maine, facing the rising price of asphalt and the cost of road maintenance, [has] decided to convert several miles of their roads to gravel. And the selectmen in the town of Cranberry Isle (pop. 118) think they can save $500,000 a year that way.

Good Shepherd Food Bank, Maine's largest, serves 107.900 people a year.

Maine Public Broadcasting - Following a two-and-a-half hour debate, members of the Maine House voted overwhelmingly against a proposal to join a national compact created to elect the president by popular vote. Maine is one of two states that is allowed to split its four electoral votes, but the plan passed by five other states would require Maine to award all four of its votes to the presidential candidate who receives the most popular votes in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Kennebec Journal - The Maine Green Independent Party candidate for governor says she's decided to forgo public funding for her campaign in light of tight state finances and will seek private funds instead. Lynne Williams . . . said that while she supports the concept of public funding for gubernatorial elections, she can't accept public money now that might be better used to help people in real need. With the state facing a $438 million budget shortfall, Williams believes the Legislature is poised to dilute the campaign fund and has made it harder for candidates to qualify.

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