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SINCE 1964, THE NEWS WHILE THERE'S STILL TIME TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT

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FOOD UNDERNEWS

Appeals court okays labelling meat by country of origin

States that best support local food

The rise of vertical farming

French government bans GMO corn

Ecowatch - France’s agriculture ministry temporarily banned the sale, use and cultivation of Monsanto’s MON 810 genetically engineered corn—the only variety that had been authorized in the European Union. Genetically engineered corn is facing fierce resistant from both French environmentalists and country officials.

The French government, which argues GE crops present environmental risks, kept pushing to institute the new ban even after the country’s highest court struck down similar measures in the past, according to Reuters.

“France’s reinstatement of its previous ban of Monsanto’s controversial genetically engineered crop … is another encouraging sign that the biotech industry’s iron grip on foreign government’s is slipping and that resistance to these flawed products is continuing to take hold,” said Dave Murphy, founder and executive director of Food Democracy Now.

The decision was strategically timed to block the seasonal planting of Monsanto’s corn by French farmers before a draft law is debated on April 10, which is aimed at banning the cultivation of foods made with genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

Kale konspiracy spreads with gentrification to New Orleans

Al Jazeera - A New York Times article called “Experiencing New Orleans With Fresh Eyes and Ears,” published earlier this month, wasn’t so different from many articles in the paper’s travel section: it delved into the culture of a city, surveying the newest and hippest in dining, art and music.

But by touching on some particularly thorny issues currently causing tension within the city — namely gentrification and the vegetable most associated with it — the piece poured salt on fresh cultural wounds, inspiring a backlash.

“I read the article before I went to bed,” said Cassi Dymond, owner of Satsuma Cafe, which was mentioned by the newspaper. “That was a mistake. It made me clench my fists.”

The story, which surveyed how recently arrived “creative types” are adapting to the city’s peculiarities, inevitably aroused anger among many residents over the rapid change taking place in New Orleans. But there was one choice line that seemed especially designed to provoke debate about a hot-button issue of gentrification.

“New Orleans is not cosmopolitan,” said one actress quoted in the Times piece. “There’s no kale here.”

The quote has so far inspired no fewer than five op-eds, several think pieces and take-downs on various local blogs, hundreds of tweets and Instagram photos tagged with #KaleGate, and even a tongue-in-cheek plan for novelty kale-flavored beer (it’s not clear if the beer was actually ever made).

But beyond the online fervor, New Orleans residents say there are real reasons the article made them feel so indignant. They say their anger isn’t so much about the kale line, or even the article as a whole, but about a pervasive sense that the power to define New Orleans increasingly lies out of the reach of native New Orleanians.

They say that with each new transplant to the city, and each new article about the city’s hipness, its true identity and real issues are swept under the rug in favor of talk of what Loyola University professor C.W. Cannon calls “New Orleans exceptionalism” — the idea that New Orleans is somehow more mystical and primitive than the rest of the U.S.

Cannon and others said the city has a long history of being misperceived as simultaneously an uncultured wasteland and a paradise for creative types who can exploit its sense of otherness for their own gain.

In the process of defining New Orleans from this outsider perspective, New Orleanians say what’s often ignored are serious social problems in the city: that it’s increasingly divided between old and new, between rich and poor, and between those who have access to things like freshly grown vegetables (including kale) and those who don’t.

That’s why the kale comment proved particularly controversial: Residents were put in a bind defending the availability of kale, but not wanting to promote the idea that bringing more kale — “the leafy green of the gentry class,” as Tulane professor and frequent commentator on gentrification Richard Campanella calls it — is a good thing. kale

Not many New Orleanians want people to stop coming to the city. But many say the way it’s defined by outsiders virtually guarantees that an important middle ground is being missed.

Few know that better than those on the front lines of both gentrification and poverty in New Orleans.

Worms now eat corn genetically modified to poison them

Independent, UK - Nature has fought back against biotechnology, with rootworms now being able to stomach corn that was genetically modified to poison the pests.

While an awe-inspiring demonstration of nature's endurance, the development could cause billions of dollars worth of damage to US crops.

Named after the pesticidal toxin-producing Bacillus thuringiensis it contains, Bt corn makes up 75% of the US's corn crop, but scientists' predictions that rootworms would evolve to overcome the poison were largely ignored by farmers, companies and regulatory bodies, who have been accused of "squandering the benefits of genetic modification."

In 2012, the average age of principal farm operators was 58.3, up 1.2 years since 2007, with 257,697 farmers 75 or older in 2012, compared to 243,472 in 2007, according to a preliminary report from the Department of Agriculture's Census of Agriculture, taken every five years. The number of principal farm operators 65 to 74 rose from 412,182 to 443,558, and from 55 to 64 from 596,306 to 608,060, while numbers of those 45-54 dropped by nearly 100,000, and those 35-44 by more than 50,000, continuing a 30-year trend of aging farmers.

The rise of food gentrification

Soleil Ho, Bitch Magazine - The phrase “food gentrification” is a lightning-quick synthesis of complex values and ideas into a compact form. Though it may seem unduly weighed down by its provocative nomenclature and its association with the plagues of coffee shop Columbuses that have descended on places like Brooklyn, Oakland, and New Orleans, gentrification’s original meaning holds true: it represents renovation, refurbishing, rebranding—and, some would add, rebirth—seemingly for the purpose of accommodating WASP tastes. At times, food gentrification and neighborhood gentrification can be seen to work in tandem, as in cases where community gardens have attracted wealthier residents to working class neighborhoods. Whether it’s the fetishization of hole-in-the-wall restaurants, twerking, or Sriracha, the gentrification cycle has birthed the momentary relevance of countless ideas and materials. Their blip on the mainstream radar is at once both novel and tragic; typecast Cuban groceries and Korean BBQ joints function as both pawn and king in the game of conspicuous consumption that manifests through venues ranging from Instagram to the Academy Awards.

Study: Pesticides hurting French sperm

Ecowatch - Pesticides used on agricultural land appear to be the main cause of declining sperm counts among men in France, according to a recent study published in the scientific journal Human Reproduction. Until better protections are in place, anti-pesticide experts suggest supporting organic agriculture as a method of avoiding exposure to these dangerous chemicals.

Until better protections are in place, anti-pesticide experts suggest supporting organic agriculture as a method of avoiding exposure to these dangerous chemicals.

The study, which first published its findings in 2012 and has now been refined, found that sperm counts across France had plummeted 30 percent in 16 years, and noted those living in mainly rural regions of southwest France had been most affected, reports Connexion—France’s English-language newspaper.

The affected regions, Aquitaine, Burgandy and Midi-Pyrenees, contain the highest concentration of farms in the country and subsequently rely heavily on agriculture for their economies.

The findings coincide with a recent development where the use of pesticides were blamed for variations in the quality of water in France, with rural areas again the most affected

Two largest grocery chains won't sell GMO salmon

Environmental News Network - The two largest grocery stores in the United States, Kroger and Safeway, have promised to not sell GMO salmon. Over 9,000 stores nationwide have now committed to being free of the controversial fish.

Kroger, the US's leading grocery chain with 2,424 stores, informed Friends of the Earth of its decision in an email from Keith Dailey, director of media relations at Kroger.

"Should genetically engineered salmon be approved, Kroger has no intention of sourcing it", Dailey wrote.

How dirt can be healthy

2013

Consumer Reports finds 97% of chicken breasts contaminated

Connecticut becomes first state to require lableling of GMO food

A bag to cook in

Interest growing in micro gardening

Foods sold in America that are banned in other countries

Oregon banning some pesticides

America's war on aspargus farmers

Food practices banned in Europe but just fine here

State by state review of war on factory farming whistleblowers
 
Eden Foods: Organic food, anti-women politics

Unsustainable agruculture growth biggest threat to biodiversity

Why is lettuce so complicated?

Rampant seafood fraud found

Chain Restaurants Boost Sales With Lower-Calorie Foods

Pressure to end corn ethanol mandate

Corporate takover of urban farming?

Burger King in UK admits using horse meat

Whole Foods faces backlash over CEO's attack on Obamacare

2012...

Global crop production stagnating in some areas

Study links pesticides used by sheep farmers to long-term brain damage

Idea Mill: Bread that can stay fresh for 60 days

Food Bank Stocks Dry Up in Wake of Great Drought

Orlando backs off of anti-front yard gardening rule

The economics of your Thanksgiving dinner

Global land seized could feed nearly a billion people

UN warns of major hunger crisis next year

Kids and food

Man wins $7 million in popcorn case

Alaskan King salmon are disappearing

Burger King to go cage free for pork and eggs

FDA rules "high fructose corn syrup" can't change its name to "corn sugar"

Super weeds threasten food production

Bill Gates knows as little about farming as he does about education

Iowa beats Canada in grain production, challenges China in soybeans

HOW COUNTRIES LOSE CONTROL OF THEIR FOOD

USDA Testing Finds 34 Unapproved Pesticides on Cilantro

One bad harvest away from chaos

RUSSIA BANS GRAIN EXPORTS

LEAD FOUND IN KIDS DRINKS AND SNACKS

CONSERVATION SAVING NORTH SEA COD

GRAIN FOR U.S. ETHANOL COULD FEED 300 MILLION FOR A YEAR

AMERICANS WASTE 40% OF THEIR FOOD

PLASTIC BECOMES FARM PROBLEM

PEAK FOOD FOLLOWS PEAK OIL

EVEN BEER THREATENED BY CLIMATE CHANGE

RICHER COUNTRIES RIPPING OFF POOR NATION'S FARMLAND

BILLION TO GO HUNGRY in 2010

GETTING THE POOR INTO COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE

FOOD SHORTAGES THREATEN TO BRING DOWN COUNTRIES

SUPER WEED THREATENS SOUTHERN CROPLAND

SOUTH AFRICAN FARMERS LOSE MILLIONS AS GM CORN CROP FAILS TO PRODUCE SEEDS

ENERGY SECRETARY CHU WARNS CALIFORNIA OF AGRI-CRISIS

SEEDING NEW GROCERY STORES

FDA APPROVES IRRADIATION OF LETTUCE & SPINACH

STUDY: HALF OF ALL FOOD IS WASTED

WORLD LEADERS DISCUSS GLOBAL FOOD CRISIS OVER GOURMET MEALS

AID GROUP SAYS IT WILL HAVE TO CUT FOOD TO 1.5 MILLION PEOPLE

ECOLOGY CONCERNS DRAW ATTENTION TO FOOD SHIPPING TRADITIONS

AGRIBUSINESS MAKING HUGE PROFITS OUT OF FOOD CRISIS

HUNGER CAUSES RISING ANGER AROUND THE WORLD

FOOD DISTANCE NOT AS BIG A FACTOR AS THOUGHT

BRITISH STUDY SAYS FOOD ADDITIVES HURT CHILDREN'S INTELLIGENCE

BIOFUELS FUEL FOOD GLOBAL FOOD DISASTER

HUGE FOOD SHORTAGE IN MUCH OF WORLD

FUEL AND LOCAL FOOD: SOME FACTS

MIDWEST AGRICULTURE BIG CONTRIBUTOR TO GULF DEAD ZONE

RISING CARBON DIOXIDE MAY HURT NUTRITION IN MAJOR CROPS

THE EARTH'S DISAPPEARING TOPSOIL

STUDY FINDS SOY CUTS SPERM COUNT

WASTED FOOD A BIG ECOLOGICAL NEGATIVE

 

Myths about genetic engineeering

Food stamps

Genetically modified food

Organic food

Statistics

Urban farming

LINKS
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AGRI SURF
CORPORATE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH PROJECT
FARM SUBSIDY DATABASE

FOOD RESEARCH & ACTION CENTER
FOODSPEAK
OREGON FARM WORKERS
ORGANIC CONSUMERS

ORGANIC FARMING RESEARCH FOUNDATION
NAT COALITON AGAINST MISUSE OF PESTICIDES
Permies: All about permaculture

PESTICIDE ACTION NETWORK
RURAL ADVANCEMENT FOUNDATION INTL
RURAL COALITION

SUSTAINABLE FARMING CONNECTIONS
UNITED FARM WORKERS

Food stats
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FDA making life harder for organic farmers

Aging farmers dramatically changing the ecoomics of farmland

FDA war on manure threatens America's small farms

2013

America's war on aspargus farmers

2012

Farmers want government to suspend ethanol gas requirement

Food stats
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2013

Harvard study says 25,000 Americans may die because of sodas and sugary drinks

Study Finds 80% of All Antibiotics in US Used for Big-Ag

2012

Number of farmers' markets more than quadruple since 1994

Corn prices at record high

Data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show that meat eating across the country fell from the 2004 high point of 184 pounds per person to 171 pounds in 2011. Early estimates for 2012 project a further reduction in American meat eating to 166 pounds, making for a 10 percent drop over the eight-year period.- Earth Policy Institute

2011

A Vanity Fair poll finds that 73% of conservatives and 75% of liberals either make buying local food a priority or do it when it is convenient. Another issue that the media ignores, but people find important. We suspect the results would be even better if local food was idenitified better.

Genetically modified crops
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Study: the prevalence of Roundup herbicide

Chinese don't like Monsanto

Some farmers turning away from GMO crops

2013

The Supreme Court's Monsanto ruling

Girl Scouts take on GMO cookies

Major food producers pulling out of GMOs - but only in Europe

Europe wins against Monsanto

Monsanto's ties to Blackwater

Monsanto sprays own workers

Pigs eating only GM grain have higher stomach inflammation

Monsanto gives up on Europe

16 Of the 22 Monsanto lobbyists have held government jobs, including the current FDA chief of foods

The Monsanto "We increase food" myth

Things to do about Monsanto

Food brands using Monsanto seeds

Monsanto trying to stop states from requiring labelling

Obama signs Monsanto protection act

Study: Roundup linked to major health problems

Some grocery stores join fight against GM food

How Monsanto is ripping off farmers

2012

Poland Bans Genetically Modified Corn, Potatoes

Monsanto Gets Its Way in Ag Bill

DOJ Mysteriously Quits Monsanto Antitrust Investigation

Kenya bans Imports of GM Food

Peru bans GMO ingredients

30 states consider GMO labelling issue

Study: GMO crops increase pesticide use

California voters strongly support labelling GMO food

An analysis of the GMO/rat controversy

Some scientists question GMO rat study

New study zaps Monsanto GM corn

France to maintain ban on genetically modified crops

French court finds Monsanto guilty in chemical poisoning case

Wikileaks: US diplomats shilled for Monsanto & Dupont to push GM crops

INDIA DELAYS INTRODUCTION OF GM FOOD DUE TO SAFETY CONCERNS

SAFETY OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS

GMO PRODUCERS PROHIBIT RESEARCH ON THEIR PLANTS

MONSANTO GOES AFTER FARMERS FOR ACTING LIKE FARMERS

Food stamps
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What food stamps have really done

Cutting food stamps is not only cruel, it will cost more money

Food stamps reduce extreme poverty

Urban farming
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The world's largest roof top farm

All about vertical farming

2013

Urban farm ideas from NYC

Urban agriculture spreading

Urban agriculture in Los Angeles

Hidden benefits of community gardens

Problems with vertical farming

Three examples of urban agriculture

First vertical farm opens in Singapore

2012

URBAN FARMING GROWS INTO A BUSINESS

Organic food
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2013

Organic food shortage

Largest wholesale distributor of organic and natural food under invesigation for violation of labor laws

Organic farming growing worldwide

2012

The part of the organic food study that the media ignored

BRITISH STUDY OF ORGANIC FOOD COMES UNDER FIRE

BRITISH GOVERNMENT STUDY FINDS ORGANIC ITEMS NO BETTER THAN ORDINARY FOOD

ORGANIC FARMLAND UP 118% SINCE 2000