American Indicators
Compiled by The Progressive Review

INDEX

HEALTH
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2014

The combined cancer death rate (deaths per 100,000 population) has been continuously declining for 2 decades, from a peak of 215.1 in 1991 to 171.8 in 2010. This 20% decline translates to the avoidance of approximately 1,340,400 cancer deaths (952,700 among men and 387,700 among women) during this time period.

2013

Major increase in middle aged suicides

Smoking cigarettes is down about 50% over the past 60 years

Nearly 45,000 people die a year because they do not have health insurance -Bernie Sanders

Two studies find women's life expectancy had retreated

@Harpers - Chance a middle-aged American woman takes antidepressants: 1 in 4

Two studies find women's life expectancy has retreated

Strokes decline over past ten years
 
America's hospitals are the most expensive part of the world’s most expensive medical system. Health care consumes nearly a fifth of economic output; 31% of that goes towards hospital care alone, some $850 billion in 2011. Considered on a cost per patient per day basis, Americans spend more than four times as much on hospital care as many other countries. Yet the costs are highly variable: 10% of hospital patients paid more than $12,000 a day while 25% pay less than $2,000.
 
70% of Americans on prescription drugs

@Harpers - Estimated number of planets in the galaxy hospitable enough to support life as intelligent as humans: 37,963

President Obama has signed 14 laws that amend, rescind or otherwise change parts of his health care law, and he’s taken five independent steps to delay the Affordable Care Act on his own, according to a new report from the Congressional Research Service.

Strokes decline over past ten years

Vast differences in healthcare costs by locale

80 million Americans didn't go to doctor last year because of cost

Harvard study says 25,000 Americans may die because of sodas and sugary drinks

HIV survival rate soars

Up to 45,000 die annually for lack of decent healthcare

2012

@Harpers - Rank of preventable medical errors among the leading causes of death in the United States: 3

Global child mortality has nearly halved in the past two decades thanks to a mixture of better aid and economic growth in poorer countries, according to a UN report. Research showed fewer than seven million children under the age of five died last year compared with nearly 12 million in 1990.

Press Watch UK - The life expectancy of those living in England's most deprived areas is up to twenty years lower than those in affluent Southern parishes. Research by the Church Urban Fund show a significant north/south divide. Women from Toxteth and Everton in Liverpool can expect to live to 74, while their counterparts in Comberton, Cambridgeshire, have an average life expectancy of 94.

CNN - The estimated number of U.S. autistic kids has skyrocketed by 78% since 2000, according to a report from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in 88 American kids has autism, according to the new figures. Among boys, it's one in 54.

Web MD - Researchers found the risk of dying has dropped by 60% over the last 75 years. The CDC report on trends on death rates in the U.S. shows the risk of death has decreased for all age groups, but the biggest improvement has been among young people. The death rate among children aged 1-4 declined 94% from 1935 to 2010, compared with a 38% decline among adults aged 85 or more. The biggest reduction was among the young, but declining death rates were also seen among the elderly. For example, death rates dropped by 62% among people aged 65-74, 58% among those 75-84, and 38% for people 85 and older.

Years by which the average life span of a homeless person is shorter than the overall average: 30

To hear that the average U.S. life expectancy was 47 years in 1900 and 78 years as of 2007, you might conclude that there weren’t a lot of old people in the old days — and that modern medicine invented old age. But average life expectancy is heavily skewed by childhood deaths, and infant mortality rates were high back then. In 1900, the U.S. infant mortality rate was approximately 100 infant deaths per 1,000 live births. In 2000, the rate was 6.89 infant deaths per 1,000 live births. - Craig Bowron, Washington Post

2011

5% of patients account for half of health care spending

Nation’s worst hospitals treat twice the percentage of poor patients and service is likely to get worse

Only 21% of Americans believe fully in evolution

Nine percent of American kids labelled ADHD

Disease clusters found in 13 states

Hunger at highest level in 15 years

90,000 Americans die annually from infections that have become resistant to antibiotics

The stats are for Britain but a fine infographic will show generally one's chances of dying of everything from heart disease to opiates and swine flu.

County health rankings

Life expectancy map by county

BBC

2010

2010

Suicide rate lowest since 1950s

Childhood mortality least since 1990s

Infarnt mortality least sinc 1950s

Fatal heart disease lowest since 1950s

Gonorrhea rate lowest since 1941

Cancer morality lowest since 1920s

Health


WASHINGTON POST

Hunger levels worst since the 1980s

Percent of families with private health insurance lowest since 1970s

Infection rates in hospitals worst since 1970s

Healthcare spending as a percent of GDP greatest since 1960s

Childhood obesity worst since 1960s.

Here's one important thing to remember about all medical research. Since 1850, the life expectancy of a white male has increased 37 years and 41 years for a white female, but over half that increase is the result of higher survival rates of those under 30. By the time you reach 70, all the money and effort we have spent on medicine has improved life expectancy by four years. For white males over 60, life expectancy has gone up five years. Yet a major part of pharma marketing is directed to this audience.

U.S. RANKS 42ND IN CHILD MORTALITY; DOWN FROM 29TH TWO DECADES AGO

U.S. RANKED 28TH FOR MOTHERS

STUDY: CANADIANS LIVE LONGER & BETTER THAN AMERICANS

2009

U.S. RANKS 42ND IN LIFE EXPECTANCY

THE PRICE OF AVOIDING SOCIALISM

BBC

ABOUT THAT TERRIBLE BRITISH HEALTH SYSTEM

STATES RANKED BY HEALTH

2008

A new study by The Commonwealth Fund Commission on a High Performance Health System finds that the United States health care system is getting worse, and that despite spending more on health care than any other industrialized nation, the US overall continues to fall far short on key indicators of health outcomes and quality, with particularly low scores on efficiency.

- The number of uninsured and underinsured continues to rise. As of 2007, 42 percent of all working age adults were either uninsured or underinsured-up from 35 percent in the four years since 2003.

- US fell from 15th to last among 19 industrialized nations when it comes to premature deaths that could potentially have been prevented by timely access to effective health care.

- Rates for basic preventive care failed to improve. Currently, only half of all adults receive the recommended preventive health care, including screening for cancer.

- Health insurance premiums rose far faster than wages, rising as a share of median incomes. Yet, insurance protection eroded. By 2007, 41 percent of adults reported that they had medical debt or trouble paying medical bills, up from 34 percent in 2005.

2007

LIFE EXPECTANCY DECLINING IN SOME PARTS OF THE COUNTRY

No one died during 2007 in accidents among larger scheduled U.S. airlines and smaller commuter aircraft, and deaths in private plane accidents dropped to 491, their lowest total in more than 40 years.

THE LIST: ODDS OF DYING IN U.S. BY CAUSE OF DEATH

U.S. HAS SECOND WORST NEWBORN BABY DEATH RATE IN THE DEVELOPED WORLD

CNN - An estimated 2 million babies die within their first 24 hours each year worldwide and the United States has the second worst newborn mortality rate in the developed world, according to a new report. American babies are three times more likely to die in their first month as children born in Japan, and newborn mortality is 2.5 times higher in the United States than in Finland, Iceland or Norway, Save the Children researchers found. Only Latvia, with six deaths per 1,000 live births, has a higher death rate for newborns than the United States, which is tied near the bottom of industrialized nations with Hungary, Malta, Poland and Slovakia with five deaths per 1,000 births.

WASH CYCLE OFFERS some fascinating statistics on the dangers of various modes of transit based on fatalities per mile. As you can see from the figures for pedestrians, fatalities per hour might be a more accurate way of figuring it out, but it's still interesting:

School Bus 0.02
Charter/tour bus 0.12
Commuter bus 0.24
Van 0.44 SUV 0.82
Other truck 1.03
Car 1.04
Pickup truck 1.12
Bicycle 5.58
Walk 19.73
Motorcycle 31.91http://washcycle.typepad.com/

2006. . .

ABOUT TWO THIRDS OF Americans support doctor-assisted suicide, according to a Gallup poll.

From 1993 to 2003, the U.S. population grew by 12 percent but emergency room visits grew by 27 percent, from 90 million to 114 million. In that same period, however, 425 emergency departments closed, along with about 700 hospitals and nearly 200,000 beds. - Washington Post

WASHINGTON TIMES - The 12 percent of the U.S. population 65 and older accounted for one-third of all hospital admissions in 2003, federal data revealed Tuesday. . . The most common procedure performed on elderly patients was blood transfusion, according to the study, and 60 percent of all blood transfusions are performed on elderly patients. . . The most common reasons elderly patients were hospitalized were congestive heart failure, pneumonia, coronary atherosclerosis, cardiac dysrhythmias, and acute myocardial infarction or heart attack. When elderly patients do go to the hospital, they are five times likelier to die than younger patients, the agency said.

http://washtimes.com/upi/20060516-125819-7266r.htm

AP - America may be the world's superpower, but its survival rate for newborn babies ranks near the bottom among modern nations, better only than Latvia. Among 33 industrialized nations, the United States is tied with Hungary, Malta, Poland and Slovakia with a death rate of nearly 5 per 1,000 babies, according to a new report. Latvia's rate is 6 per 1,000.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/health/3850137.html

IN THE PAST 50 year, medicine and changes in lifestyle has increased the lifespan of a 65 year old man by only 3.7 years.

2004

 

STUDY DOCUMENTS INCREASE IN CALORIE CONSUMPTION

ANAHAD O'CONNOR, NY TIMES - From 1971 to 2000, the study found, women increased their caloric intake by 22 percent, men by 7 percent. Much of the change was found to be due to an increase in the amount of carbohydrates we have been eating. . . And while the percentage of calories Americans get from fat, especially saturated fats, has decreased, the numbers might be deceiving. The actual amount of fat eaten daily has gone up. It just makes up a smaller percentage of the total caloric pie now that we are eating so many more carbs.

. . . Cookies, pasta, soda and other carbohydrates appear to be mostly to blame. Among women, carbohydrates jumped from about 45 percent of the daily caloric intake to almost 52 percent. For men, they grew from 42 percent to 49 percent.

According to the National Institutes of Health, the average person passes intestinal gas from 14 to 23 times a day and produces about 1 to 3 pints of the stuff. That may be more than you expect. Many people who believe that they are excessively gassy actually have perfectly ordinary amounts, says Steven Edmundowicz, MD, chief of endoscopy at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [WEb MD]