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The Progressive Review

The corporate confederacy
Trans Pacific Partnership & other corporate attacks
on America's sovreignty

TPP likely be the most disloyal legislation since the Confederacy seceded

Progressive Review - In fact, during the Confederacy, some states seceded, but the rest were left with their sovereignty. Under TPP, the sovereignty of the United States, the power of its constitution, and the rights of its people will be stunningly damaged by ad hoc international bodies and international corporations. Although this has been creeping up on us, thanks to anti-American agreements such as NAFTA, we can think of no other legislation since the Confederacy seceded that will be such a massive act of disloyalty.

At least with the Confederacy, we knew what was going on. Today our major media treats contastrophes created by the establishment as just busines as usual.

Why it's okay to call the TPP fast track fascism

The effort to ram through a secret anti-democratic, anti-constitutional trade bill is another sign of America's silent drift towards fascism. Fascism is not Nazism, but rather a form of government as definable as, say, democracy. Here's how I described it almost a decade ago:

Sam Smith, 2006 - In the first place, one needs to separate Hitler, Nazism and fascism. Conflating these leads the unwary to assume easily that all three are inevitably characterized by anti-semitism, when in fact only the first two are. By avoiding this distinction we don't have to face the fact that America is closer to fascism than it has ever been in its history.

To understand why, one needs to look not at Hitler but at the founder of fascism, Mussolini. What Mussolini founded was the estato corporativo - the corporative state or corporatism. Writing in Economic Affairs in the mid 1970s, R.E. Pahl and J. T. Winkler described corporatism as a system under which government guides privately owned businesses towards order, unity, nationalism and success. They were quite clear as to what this system amounted to: "Let us not mince words. Corporatism is fascism with a human face. . . An acceptable face of fascism, indeed, a masked version of it, because so far the more repugnant political and social aspects of the German and Italian regimes are absent or only present in diluted forms."

Thus, although the model generally cited in defense of organized capitalism is that of the contemporary Japanese, the most effective original practitioners of a corporative economy were the Italians. Unlike today's Japanese, but like contemporary America, their economy was a war economy.

Adrian Lyttelton, describing the rise of Italian fascism in The Seizure of Power, writes: "A good example of Mussolini's new views is provided by his inaugural speech to the National Exports Institute on 8 July 1926. . . Industry was ordered to form 'a common front' in dealing with foreigners, to avoid 'ruinous competition,' and to eliminate inefficient enterprises. . . The values of competition were to be replaced by those of organization: Italian industry would be reshaped and modernized by the cartel and trust. . .There was a new philosophy here of state intervention for the technical modernization of the economy serving the ultimate political objectives of military strength and self-sufficiency; it was a return to the authoritarian and interventionist war economy."

Lyttelton writes that "fascism can be viewed as a product of the transition from the market capitalism of the independent producer to the organized capitalism of the oligopoly." It was a point that Orwell had noted when he described fascism as being but an extension of capitalism. Lyttelton quoted Nationalist theorist Affredo Rocco: "The Fascist economy is. . . an organized economy. It is organized by the producers themselves, under the supreme direction and control of the State."....

Germany's willingness to accept Hitler was the product of many cultural characteristics specific to that country, to the anger and frustrations in the wake of the World War I defeat, to extraordinary inflation and particular dumb reactions to it, and, of course, to the appeal of anti-Semitism. Still, consideration of the Weimar Republic that preceded Hitler does us no harm. Bearing in mind all the foregoing, there was also:

- A collapse of conventional liberal and conservative politics that bears uncomfortable similarities to what we are now experiencing.

- The gross mismanagement of the economy and of such key worker concerns as wages, inflation, pensions, layoffs, and rising property taxes. Many of the actions were taken in the name of efficiency, an improved economy and the "rationalization of production." There were also bankruptcies, negative trade balance, major decline in national production, large national debt rise compensated for by foreign investment. In other words, a hyped version of what America and its workers are experiencing today.

- The Nazis as the first modern political party. As University of Pennsylvania professor Thomas Childers explains, the Nazis discovered the importance of campaigning not just during campaigns but between elections when the other parties folded their tents. With this "perpetual campaigning" they spread themselves like a virus, considering the public reaction to everything right down to the colors used for posters and rally backgrounds....

- The use of negative campaigning, a contribution to modern politics by Joseph Goebbels. The Nazi campaigns argued what was wrong with their opponents and ignored stating their own policies.

- The Nazis as the inventors of modern political propaganda. Every modern American political campaign and the types of arguments used to support them owes much to the ideas of the Nazis.

- The suddenness of the Nazi rise. The party went from less than 3% of the vote to being the largest party in the country in four years.

- The collapse of the country's self image. Childers points out that Germany had had been a world leader in education, industry, science, and literacy. Much of the madness that we see today stems from attempts to compensate for our battered self-image.

So while many of the behaviors that would come to be associated with Nazis and Hitler - from physical attacks on political opponents to the death camps - seem far removed from our present concerns, there is still much to learn from their history.

We are clearly in a post-constitutional era; the end of the First American Republic. Depending on what day it is we think of its replacement variously - ranging from an adhocracy to proto-fascism. But one does not need to know the end of the story to know that we headed at a rapid pace away from the extraordinary principles of American democracy towards the dark hole of power with impunity, to the sort of world in which, as Rudolph Giuliani has calmly asserted, "freedom is about authority."

If we describe present differences only in contemporary terms then we have nothing to guide us but what happened yesterday...

Article 48 of the constitution of the Weimar Republic stated, "In case public safety is seriously threatened or disturbed, the Reich President may take the measures necessary to reestablish law and order, if necessary using armed force. In the pursuit of this aim, he may suspend the civil rights described in articles 114, 115, 117, 118, 123, 124 and 153, partially or entirely. The Reich President must inform the Reichstag immediately about all measures undertaken . . . The measures must be suspended immediately if the Reichstag so demands."

It was this article that Hitler used to peacefully establish his dictatorship. And why was it so peaceful and easy? Because, according to Childers, the 'democratic" Weimar Republic had already used it 57 times prior to Hitler's ascendancy.

When you add to this the remarkable incompetence of the current regime, the collapse of both traditional liberal and conservative politics, and the economic crises, it feels like a new Weimar Republic setting the stage for awful things we can not at this point even imagine. It may be that history has something to tell us after all.

How trade deals damage our constitution

200 scholars attack TPP as threat to democracy

The problem with free trade deals

Obama and Congress surrendered to major corporate invasion

2015

How TPP would damage small business

TPP a corporate coup d'etat

Hillary Clinton already waffling on TPP

HRC pushed trade deal numerous times in past

TPP: All that we feared

TPP: The most disloyal government action of modern times

The big dangers in TPP

Look who can read TPP

More things wrong with TPP

European trade deal could make your personal data available overseas

How TPP could affect freedom of speech

I’ve actually read the TPP text ...I can tell you that Elizabeth Warren is right about her criticism of the trade deal

Anti-Israel boycott provision shows up in TPP

Two major cities strongly oppose Fast Track

TPP: Fast track to hell

Who's behind the TPP

How TPP could damage your health

Details of TPP leaked

Fake "progressive" group formed to push TPP

Why is TPP's contents a secret?

More evidence TPP will be a big job killer

Democrats hurt their own base with trade pacts

TPP: A pending disaster

Inside the TPP's attack on American sovreignty

America's trade deals have been a disaster

2014

How NAFTA hurt America

TPP scam misses another deadline

How TPP could kill the Internet

TPP: Corporate terrorism against the nation state

How TPP will make drugs less affordable

Why TPP is being kept secret

TPP: Corporate terrorism against the nation state

Things the Washington Post doesn't tell its readers: TPP is no free trade agreement & slicing Social Security is a "cut," not a "cost saving."

TPP exposed by Wikileaks

TPP would allow investors to sue America in international court

TPP's threat to nationhood

2013

If Snowden is a traitor than what about those who backed NAFTA and TPP?

Green Party calls for halt on TPP